Thursday, July 28, 2011

Active Play: Part 6 of the Healthy Kids Challenge Way to Teach MyPlate to Kids

Active Play Every Day is one of the HKC Healthy6 messages, and matches up with MyPlate key messages teaching kids to "Be Active Your Way". Teach Active Play to kids using this lesson titled Active Play in Every Day. Utilize MyPlate and activities kids enjoy to help kids hear, see, and practice the lesson.

Active Play in Every Day (Lesson 7: Grades 3-5, Balance My DayTM)

Outcomes: HECAT Standards 1.11, 1.15

Sample Discussion Point: For most kids, eating a healthy plate and less of high fat and added sugar foods, plus 60 minutes of Active Play every day gives healthy balance. If you eat too much fat and sugar, it is hard or impossible to get enough Active Play to balance the “energy in”.

Sample Discussion Question: If you have more “energy in” (food or drink), than the “energy out”, what can happen?

Activity

1. Divide kids into teams of 4. Explain that too much TV and screen time (like computers and video games) keep kids and adults from getting enough Active Play.

2. Ask teams to come up with 4 kinds of Active Play with these “rules”:
  • The activities are something everyone on the team likes. Finding things you like to do together is a way you and your friends can encourage each other to be active.
  • They are activities most people can do at any time and they do not cost or require traveling far to participate.
3. As a whole group, ask teams to share and discuss their activity ideas. If time allows, perform some of the Active Play ideas.

4. Distribute the Lesson 7 Worksheet. Guide kids to individually complete the worksheet.

Move and Learn

Perform “My Body” - An activity of song and motion!

1. Practice singing the following lyrics to the tune of My Bonnie Lies Over the Ocean:

-My body lies over the sofa.
-My body watches too much TV.
-My body lies over the armchair, oh bring back my body to me.
-Bring back, bring back, oh bring back my body to me, to me.
-Bring back, bring back, oh bring back my body to me.

2. Once the class is familiar with the lyrics, explain they should sit or stand each time they sing a word beginning with “b”.

3. Start in a standing position. (At the end, everyone should be standing.)

4. Explain too much TV and screen time means less Active Play and less “energy in” balance.

5. Choose at least 60 minutes of Active Play every day.

Balance My Day nutrition education

Summary

Healthy weight happens when “energy in” (food and drinks) = “energy out” (Active Play”). Too much high fat and added sugar food can overload “energy in”, making it hard to get enough Active Play for good balance.

These are just sample parts of Lesson 7 - the sample lesson activity and the Move and Learn activity are from p. 111 in grades 3-5 Balance My Day Nutrition Education Curriculum. The worksheet, , discussion points and questions, and answer key are available for your review, along with school nutrition services and Taste and Learn activities supporting this lesson. Learn more on the Balance My Day Nutrition Education Curriculum page, or contact us with questions.

Thursday, July 21, 2011

Snack Attack: Part 5 of the Healthy Kids Challenge Way to Teach MyPlate to Kids

Snack Attack is one of the HKC Healthy6 messages, and matches up with MyPlate key messages teaching kids to compare sodium, sugar and fat in foods and choose foods with lower numbers. Teach Snack Attack to kids using this lesson titled A Balanced Day. Utilize MyPlate and trail mix to help kids hear, see, and practice the lesson.

A Balanced Day (Lesson 10: Grades 3-5, Balance My DayTM)

Outcomes: HECAT Standards 5.3, 6.1, 6.3, 7.12

Materials: Trail mix ingredients and supplies, 5 sets of juggling scarves in MyPlate food group colors or labeled paper plates

Activity

*You have the option of using trail mix ingredient packaging for label reading, with or without creating an actual trail mix for tasting. If tasting is incorporated, check for food allergies in advance.
  1. For each ingredient, ask kids to guess the food group.
    1. Ask which food groups are missing. (Unless pumpkin seeds or dried tomatoes are used, the answers will be Milk and Vegetable).
    2. Ask them to identify which ingredient doesn’t belong in any food group and why. (M&M’s® have “energy in” and no healthy nutrients.)
    3. Ask kids to guess the correct serving sizes for ingredients. Measure the correct serving and an incorrect serving for each of the foods below. Place each food in a clear plastic cup and label appropriately and ask participants to guess the correct serving. --OR-- Have the participant scoop out what theey think is the correct serving from a “bowl of food” and then use a measuring cup to see how close they really are.
  2. Using Nutrition Facts labels from trail mix ingredients, ask kids to:
    1. Rank order the foods from most to least amount of fat per serving, with the highest fat food on the far right.
    2. Now rank order the foods from the most to the least amount of sugar per serving, with the food with the most sugar on the far right.
    3. Repeat for the amounts of sodium from most to least.
    4. Option: Use sugar cubes or teaspoons of fat (margarine pats) to demonstrate the actual amount of sugar or fat in each serving. 1 sugar cube = 4 grams sugar; 1 tsp. fat = 4 grams fat.
    5. Ask kids, in building a trail mix with MyPlate portions, to identify which foods are in greatest amount, and those in the smallest amount. Have kids make a trail mix snack with the foods on the table, keeping balance according to MyPlate (proper portions).
Note: Remember handwashing and food safety.
Supplies for Snack Attack Trail Mix For 25 servings Scoop size
Cheerios® (9 cups per 9 oz.) 1 - 9 oz. box 1/4 cup
Wheat Chex® (6.75 cups per 14 oz.) 1 - 14 oz. box 1/4 cup
Pretzels, mini (10.5 cups per 15 oz.) 1 - 15 oz. box 1/4 cup
Craisins® or raisins (3.75 cups per 24 oz.) 1 - 12 oz. box 1 Tbsp.
Dry roasted peanuts or soy nuts (3 cups per 16 oz.) 1 - 16 oz. jar 1 Tbsp.
M&M’s® (approx. 21 servings per 12.6 oz.) 1 - 12 oz. bag 1 Tbsp.
Disposable cups or baggies to hold approx. 1 1/4 cup 25
Option: Add sundried tomato bits or pumpkin seeds to represent veggie food group (2 cups per 25 servings). Use a Tbsp. for a serving size

Note: Students with peanut allergies will not be able to have either peanuts or M&M’s® . Consider soy nuts and only approved candies.

Move and Learn
  1. Group kids in 5 straight lines of equal numbers. Have each group form the spokes of a circle, at least 1 1/2 arm lengths apart.
  2. To the first person in each line, give 5 scarves (or paper plates) of the same MyPlate color group. (There will be orange, green, red, blue, and purple lines.) Ask each team to identify one healthy snack food from their color group.
  3. Ask the first student in line to begin passing the scarves, alternating turning from right to left, to the student behind them. The last student in line will collect all the scarves and begin the same activity, in reverse order, from back to front.
  4. When all the scarves reach the front of the line, let kids know they will begin building their MyPlate. They are to pass one of their scarves to the first person in the line to their right. Now each group will have 1 scarf of another color.
  5. Repeat the up and down the line activity described in #3.
  6. As described in #4, when all the scarves reach the front of the line, pass one scarf from their original color group to the next line. After 5 times, all 5 groups will have a set of all 5 major MyPlate color groups.
Summary

For plenty of energy, a healthy heart and body, and to feel and look the best you can, make healthy eating choices and balance them with Active Play every day.

Balance My Day nutrition education

These are just sample parts of Lesson 10 - the sample lesson activity and the Move and Learn activity are from p. 173 in grades 3-5 Balance My Day Nutrition Education Curriculum. The worksheet, teacher resource, student assessment, discussion points and questions, and answer key are available for your review, along with school nutrition services and Taste and Learn activities supporting this lesson. Learn more on the Balance My Day Nutrition Education Curriculum page, or contact us with questions.

Thursday, July 14, 2011

Drink Think: Part 4 of the Healthy Kids Challenge Way to Teach MyPlate to Kids


Drink Think is one of the HKC Healthy6 messages, and matches up with MyPlate key messages teaching kids to drink milk and water instead of sugary drinks. Teach Drink Think to kids using this lesson titled Think Breakfast Drinks. Utilize MyPlate and a milk experiment to help kids hear, see, and practice the lesson.

Think Breakfast Drinks (Lesson 5: Grades 3-5, Balance My DayTM)

Outcomes: HECAT Standards 1.8, 1.11, 3.4, 7.5

Materials: Dairy group food cards, Milk, 3 shallow bowls, dish soap, food coloring, cotton swabs

Sample Discussion Point
MyPlate recommends kids ages 9-13 choose 3 cups of low fat or fat free milk (or calcium equivalents) each day.

Sample Discussion Question
Do the drinks you choose for breakfast have added sugar and are they high in fat?

Activity

1. Perform the Milk Fat Experiment. (Use Teacher’s Resource, p. 70 in Balance My Day. The source for this experiment is the American Chemical Society, Science for Kids, and can be downloaded at http://portal.acs.org/portal/fileFetch/C/WPCP_012696/pdf/WPCP_012696.pdf.

2. Talk about how food labels are a good source of nutrition information. Many popular drinks are high in fat and added sugar.

3. Using the Lesson 5 Worksheet-1, have kids
a. look at the milk Nutrition Facts labels and locate the fat content.
b. determine if the amount of fat listed confirms what they saw in the experiment.

4. Now look at the chocolate milk label and locate the fat. Point out some chocolate milk is low in fat, but this is not. Compare the amount of sugar in the chocolate milk with that in the whole milk. Compare the list of ingredients. (Sugar and corn syrup are added sugars.)

5. Look at the Nutrition Facts label serving sizes. How much milk does MyPlate recommend each day? How do these serving sizes compare?

Move and Learn

Explain to feel our best, it takes a partnership of healthy eating choices (energy in) and Active Play(energy out).
  • Partners for healthy balance: choosing less of foods and beverages high in fat and added sugar and Active Play.
  • Partners for strong bones: Calcium we get from milk (and other foods) and Active Play. When we include weight-bearing activities, there is better calcium absorption.
  • “Partner-up” 3 servings of milk and weight-bearing activities for stronger bones.
  • Practice these weight-bearing movements while discussing the partnerships:
* Walk in place
* Hop forward and then back
* Dance
* Play hopscotch
* Jump rope

Drink Think milk!

Summary

Drink Think at breakfast. Drinking three cups of milk a day is a healthy choice. Milk is rich in calcium and Vitamin D. For a healthy heart and healthy balance, choose foods low in fat and added sugar.

Balance My Day nutrition education

These are just sample parts of Lesson 5 - the sample lesson activity and the Move and Learn activity are from p. 47 in Grades 3-5 Balance My DayTM Nutrition Education Curriculum. The worksheet, student assessment, discussion points and questions, and answer key are available for your review, along with school nutrition services and Taste and Learn activities supporting this lesson. Learn more on the Balance My Day Nutrition Education Curriculum page, or contact us with questions.

Thursday, July 7, 2011

Breakfast: Part 3 of the Healthy Kids Challenge Way to Teach MyPlate to Kids

Breakfast GO Power is one of the HKC Healthy6 messages, and matches up with MyPlate key messages teaching kids to increase certain foods, such as whole grains and dairy. Teach Breakfast GO Power to kids using this lesson titled MyPlate, My Planning Tool. Utilize MyPlate and food pictures to help kids hear, see, and practice the lesson.

MyPlate, MyPlanning Tool (Lesson 3: Grades 3-5, Balance My Day)

Outcomes: This lesson meets HECAT standards: 1.1, 1.2, 3.1, 7.10

Materials: MyPlate poster, Balance My Day Food Cards or food pictures cut from magazines, paper and pencils

Sample Discussion Point
MyPlate is a reliable source for information and a tool for healthy eating choices and meal planning. There are 5 major MyPlate food groups. There isn’t any one group that gives us all the nutrients our body needs. It takes a variety of foods from each group for good health.

Sample Discussion Question
Look at the MyPlate symbol as you discuss the questions:
For breakfast meal planning, nutrition experts often recommmend choosing a complete breakfast from at least 3 of the 5 major MyPlate food groups. From which 3 food groups would you choose?

Activity:

Pre-Prep: Have Balance My Day food cards available and visible for kids to get menu ideas.

1. Divide students into 5 teams, and give each team a sheet of paper and pencil.

2. Ask each team to:
a. Create, with at least 3 foods from the 5 major MyPlate groups, 2 healthy breakfast menus. The breakfast menus should be something they would eat and they think their friends would like, too.
b. Use adjectives to describe and make their menu item sound good.

3. After creating the menus, have each team present the menus to the rest of the group.

Move and Learn

1. Divide students into 5 teams.

2. Explain teams will be running a relay. Each kid on a team will pick up a food card that represents one of the 5 major food groups. The goal is to use the cards to build a healthy plate.

3. Set the food cards in an easily accessible place, a distance away from the teams.

4. As they pick up their cards “relay style”, call out different movements (baby steps, giant steps, step like a duck). Kids waiting in line for their teammate can walk in place.

5. With 5 cards in hand, have teams build their plate on the floor in MyPlate food group order.

Summary

MyPlate is a reliable source of information and a tool for healthy eating choices and meal planning. There are 5 major MyPlate groups. There isn’t any one group that gives us all the nutrients our body needs. We need to choose a variety of foods from each group for good health.

Balance My Day

These are just sample parts of Lesson 3 - the sample lesson activity and the Move and Learn activity are from p. 43 in grades 3-5 Balance My Day Nutrition Education Curriculum. The worksheet, student assessment, discussion points and questions, and answer key are available for your review, along with school nutrition services and Taste and Learn activities supporting this lesson. Learn more on the Balance My Day Nutrition Education Curriculum page, or contact us with questions.

Friday, July 1, 2011

Fruits & Vegetables: Part 2 of the Healthy Kids Challenge Way to Teach MyPlate to Kids

Fruits & Veggies Every Day the Tasty Way is one of the HKC Healthy6 messages, and matches up with MyPlate key messages teaching kids to make 1/2 their plates fruits & veggies. Teach Fruits & Veggies Every Day the Tasty Way to kids using this lesson titled Fruits &Veggies, Crunch and Munch. Utilize MyPlate and colors of the fruit & veggie rainbow to help kids hear, see, and practice the lesson.

Fruits & Veggies, Crunch and Munch (Lesson 6: Grades 3-5, Balance My Day)

Outcomes: This lesson meets HECAT Standards 1.6, 6.1, 6.4, 7.4, 8.2, 8.3

Materials: Crayons, paper plates

Activity:
  1. On a paper plate, have kids draw a rainbow with fruit and veggie color bands (purple/blue-green-white-red-yellow/orange). Make the color band wide enough to write in fruits and veggies. Label the colors of the bands.
  2. In the appropriate color band, ask kids to write the fruits and veggies they ate yesterday and today. Determine the color by the edible portion. For example, bananas are white because the yellow peel is not edible. Refer to the Teacher Resource, Fruits and Veggies Color Category.
  3. As a class, for each color group tally the number of fruits and veggies eaten and most/least colors consumed. Graph the results.
  4. Identify textures. Ask kids to determine how the number of “crunchy” fruits and veggies compares to the number of “soft” fruits and veggies. Talk about how to add variety with different fruit and veggie colors and textures to the day.
  5. Distribute Lesson 6 Fruit & Veggie Log.
    1. Ask kids to keep a two-day log. At the end of two days, have them bring the log to class and underline each entry with the corresponding color.
    2. Discuss the colors, textures, what was most/least reported, and how to add more color or variety.
Move and Learn:
  1. Divide kids into groups of 4-5 and ask each group to form a circle.
  2. Have each kid think of their favorite fruit or veggie (f/v) and a movement (hop, touch toes, etc).
    1. Identify a start point on the circle. The first kid will announce their choice of f/v and movement. Everyone in the circle will repeat the f/v and perform the movement.
    2. Move clockwise to the second kid and so on, repeating the activity.
    3. Continue in this manner until the circle is complete.
    Summary:

    Choose plant foods like fruits, veggies, and whole grains for fiber. For the greatest amount of fiber, eat the skin of fruits and veggies and choose fruit instead of juice. Fiber makes us feel full, making overeating less likely. Fiber also helps lower cholesterol for a healthier heart and keeps food moving through our digestive system.
                                                          Balance My Day
    These are just 2 parts of Lesson 6- the sample lesson activity and the Move and Learn activity from p. 165 in grades 3-5 Balance My Day Nutrition Education Curriculum. The worksheet, teacher resource, fruit/veggie log, student assessment, discussion points and questions, and answer key are available for your review, along with school nutrition services and Taste and Learn activities supporting this lesson. Learn more on the Balance My Day Nutrition Education Curriculum page, or contact us with questions.